A Project for Better Journalism chapter
A&E

Don’t drive like this on the real roads!

Extreme Road Trip 2 is the next big game for anyone who enjoys mobile gaming. It is engaging, fun and objective oriented.

Here’s how the game works: you begin with one car, “The Compact”, and drive through a course where you control the car by tilting it either forwards or backwards. The goal is to try to keep the car from landing on any part other than its wheels for as long as you can. Meanwhile, try to catch the coins and fuel cans along the way. But here’s where the fun comes in: using the controls you can tilt your car enough to perform flips, and the more flips you do when you jump, the more speed you get when you land. Each car has a certain set of objectives to be obtained, these are usually something along the lines of doing a certain number of flips in a single jump or collecting a given amount of coins in a round. When five objectives are complete you earn coins and power-ups, making it easier to complete the next objectives. As more and more miles and objectives are accumulated you get to move up to the next level, which yields more coins and power-ups.

The best way to improve playing this game is to know the particular vehicle you’re working with really well, specifically how close to the ground you can be and still complete an entire front or backflip.

Extreme Road Trip 2 is quite creative with their vehicles. They have everything from speedy hot rods and hovercrafts to safari trucks and sleek sports cars, even classic hollywood vehicles, (look for the “88” and the “Ghost”). Each one costs a different amount and has a unique design and set of capabilities. Choose wisely though, you’ll learn that money doesn’t go a very long way in this game.

The biggest issue with this app is that it is a bit too complicated; there’s too much clutter. In other words, there is a constant push to get more virtual money to buy as many of the 114 cars as you can and then pay your way through the various upgrade levels either by doing the work or just paying real money through the available in-app purchases. This is typical of many game app developers and is ultimately just another way for them to make more money. In and of itself that isn’t a problem but it does produce a dramatic ensemble of ads, offers and upgrades that could end up being a turn-off for many users.

Familiar?

Familiar?

This display shows up at the beginning of every round. The power-ups in the middle can be used by tapping on them. Use the arrows at the corners of the screen to control the tilt of the car.

This display shows up at the beginning of every round. The power-ups in the middle can be used by tapping on them. Use the arrows at the corners of the screen to control the tilt of the car.

This pops up after the car crashes, showing the distance, coins collected, stunts and objectives completed from each round.

This pops up after the car crashes, showing the distance, coins collected, stunts and objectives completed from each round.

"The Compact" racing through the underground course.

“The Compact” racing through the underground course.

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